Thursday, 22 September 2016

rubbish investigation findings



We read an article about a fleet of research waka which spent two years criss crossing the Pacific ocean, observing rubbish in the Pacific Ocean.   They noticed that if they found rubbish in the ocean, it usually meant they were getting close to land.  Because of this, we infer that most rubbish in the ocean comes from land. 

We wondered if the rubbish in our playground might have a similar trend.   We decided, before lunch on Wednesday last week, to go and find out. 

We split the school into 12 sections on a map.  Each. section had a group of scientist (us!) to make observations and inferences.

We put a red dot on the map wherever we found a piece of rubbish and collected all the rubbish. 
After lunch we went back, and noted with a blue dot, any new rubbish found in our area.  We also collected this rubbish.   This is our map, showing where we found rubbish, both times.




We also classified the rubbish we found into types of rubbish and displayed this into this graph.

Our observations and inferences: 

We observed that most of the red dot rubbish (rubbish found before lunch) was caught up in fences, around buildings and in bushes, especially tussock grass. 

We think this might be because the wind has blown rubbish left on the ground by students into the bushes where it has been trapped.  The spikes on the bushes help to trap the rubbish.  Some children might hide their rubbish under buildings at lunchtimes. Some people might be throwing the rubbish over fences too.  Rubbish gets blown from the field into the ditch and can’t be blown out again. 

As you can see the rubbish is in different parts of the school but most of the rubbish is all around Darren's shed. I this is  because people just think it is ok to throw the rubbish. But how do we get the rubbish out of there and clean it up because  some people don't care about their era.

The areas that attract more rubbish are where people eat and near fences because the wind blows it into fences and tussocks where it can get trapped.

The rubbish we collected was round where most people eat. We found lots of the rubbish under buildings and in bushes. We think that some kids might have thrown their rubbish  in the gaps of under buildings so that it is hidden. What we don't realise is that this is affecting the environment. The problem with our data is that we can't put all the red dot rubbish under the buildings on the map because it is black and hard to see the rubbish. So we had to put it close to the sides of the like outside the school in bushes round fences and other places like that. The wind is worse because more rubbish gets dropped every day and it if it gets spread it will be harder to collect.  

Most of the Rubbish comes out of the little kids pockets when they are running.We have learned that the rubbish spreads around the areas where the kids play like the playground rubbish falls out of kids pocket and people put it on the ground. We need to stop littering! We can help this by not being so lazy and dropping it on the ground.
BUT WAIT, THERE’S MORE!

After we made these observations and inferences, we were left with questions as to why people in our school failed to put their rubbish in the bins! Why does so much end up back around the school after one break time? Maybe it is falling out of people's pockets? Perhaps it's the winds fault? Or maybe the students of Waimairi school are dropping it on purpose?

Since then, we have recorded how rubbish was dropped at morning tea and lunch. Basically, we spied on the school! We, as scientists, have completed an investigation into why rubbish is ending up on the ground. On Thursday the 18th of August, we went out at morning tea and lunchtime to make observations of you all, collecting data to find out how rubbish gets on the ground.

We split up into 12 groups. At morning tea we spread ourselves around the whole school to observe. At lunchtime we spread the 12 groups around the lunch eating areas and observed what happened to the rubbish. 
We have made inferences from our observations and here is what we found:






At morning tea time, Waimairi school dropped 205 pieces of rubbish. That's 2 out of 5 people on average who dropped rubbish. 110 pieces of rubbish were dropped on purpose, which is more than half of the rubbish we observed being dropped. We also saw 46 pieces of rubbish dropped without the person realising that they had dropped it, often as they were walking.We also saw rubbish being dropped from pockets.

The places we found that rubbish had been dropped the most, were the Te Puna block, the walkway down to Ara Atu and the playground behind room 13. We think this might be because people playing in these areas may not understand why it is important to put rubbish in the bin. We also inferred that since there's big bushes at Ara Atu, people think they can hide their rubbish there.

Also, there is no rubbish bin in sight of the playground in these areas, so people lazily drop it instead. We think that most people do this because they think that they can hide it, or can get away with dropping it, even when they know it is wrong. And they do get away with it! Why don't people take a little walk over to the bin to put their rubbish where it belongs? 


LUNCHTIME FINDINGS

PIE GRAPH OF LUNCHTIME OBSERVATIONS HERE

At lunchtime, 219 pieces of rubbish were dropped throughout the school JUST during lunch eating time. That's 2 out of every 5 people in the school on average. that is a large amount of people to be dropping rubbish.
From what we saw, 79 pieces of rubbish were dropped on purpose, and 44 were left where people were eating. 

Just like at morning tea time, we think that around the school most of the people drop the rubbish because there's not enough rubbish bins around. Although there are already some bins, there only a few, and sometimes not in the best places. 
We also think that some children might not be able to reach the bins because we observed the bins are quite a bit taller than some junior children. Younger students also may not understand why it is bad to leave rubbish on the ground.

We could maybe get more and smaller bins to show others that bins are valued around the school but we think most of the kids already know about why we shouldn't  drop rubbish - because it will cause lots of problems for the animals in our environment and make our school look messy.

We spotted some differences between Morning Tea and Lunchtime. At lunch-eating time, more pieces of rubbish were dropped than the whole of morning tea time, even though morning tea is longer than lunch eating time. We think that more rubbish was dropped at lunch because more food is eaten at lunchtime and there would be a bigger chance of rubbish flying out of their lunchboxes. Lunch food is also more likely to have wrappers. However we also inferred that people might deliberately litter so that they don’t get in trouble for walking to the bin - as we are not allowed to stand up during lunch eating time.

Under the classroom is also a common place to put rubbish. But the reason  that people drop rubbish there is because they think no one will notice. But we did! But if you think that you get away with it, then you are wrong because we see rubbish everywhere, even in sneaky places where people will think you can't see it.

Overall, 424 pieces of rubbish were dropped in the 45 minutes we were observing that day. That’s almost one piece of rubbish per person. If nobody ever picks this rubbish up, then by the end of the week there would be 2120 pieces of rubbish floating around the school.  Many people dropped their rubbish on purpose, but also accidentally, leaving it where they ate or hiding it.

We think if we all work together our school can be cleaner by just simply walking  to the bin, because just doing a simple thing like that will help to make a big difference. But we also think that during lunch eating time we should be allowed to stand up to walk to the bin to put our rubbish in it. We will be discussing this with the teachers. This means people will be less likely to throw it in the bushes, under the buildings, leave it where they were eating or just throw it on the ground.

We also plan to write to the board of trustees to see if we can have more bins built permanently into the areas that we’ve observed to gather the most rubbish. We also need bins that are the right size for younger kids as well.

So what is the most important thing for you to remember from today? Do not drop rubbish on purpose. It’s pretty simple.  Please walk the few metres to the bins, otherwise we will all be swimming in a pool of rubbish.








Tuesday, 20 September 2016

Own up to your mistakes




This term we were writing our speeches. My speech was about breaking things and not owning up. I was claiming that you should own up because then you will feel like a better person.
Our class were learning to structure our speeches because it will be interesting and hook people in.  For example, I put a rhetorical question at the start and I used three mini examples.
I think it went well because I was able to think of ideas quickly, especially since my family members had past stories themselves. I feel like I have improved well from last years speech. I definitely feel more confident presenting this year's speech. I think I have improved on describing things and using punctuation. For example I used to not realise that I had no added full stops and capital letters and the teacher would have to remind me or do it for me. But now I just read through it and remind myself to add full stops and capital letters.  It becomes easier once you've got into the habit. Click here to listen to my speech...  


🐻Speech🐻


Do you own up to your mistakes?
Maybe you accidentally broke your new clock. Or perhaps you accidentally pulled down the curtains or even ripped someone else's teddy?, You know what I mean. Maybe this has happened to you, but did you tell anyone?  Think back to a time you were dreading to tell someone what you did, but you too worried to let it out so you try to forget it and move on with your life. Then the teacher holds up a broken object and you shuffle into the background feeling all hot inside. We all make mistakes but we need to know how to fix them.


Picture this. You're at your friend's house making a hut with blankets and pillows, but wait, the chairs are in the lounge. Your friend repeats “I'll go get the chairs you wait here”. You start to fiddle around with one of  her  toys. It was a old black car with a pink frog inside. The frog was wearing a gold crown and it was very sparkly,with the gold glitter from the paint  shining in from the window. Your friend had told you it was her mum's and that she had it when she was little. You could tell by looking at it that it was well loved. You suddenly hear  your friend dragging the chair along the floor and without even realising it just slips right out of the palm of your hand, then you hear a bang. You look down, and there is the car tipped on its side. Your blood runs cold as a bit of plastic goes gliding along the shiny wood floor. You have no clue of what to do, yet there is a list of options right in front of you. But you choose to hesitantly hide it under a pile of toys that you happen to see next to you. Then you see your friend dragging 3 chairs into the room. Luckily she doesn't notice it is gone and you both carry on. But you're still hiding the guilt.


Or maybe you're at your grandparents house and you're watching telly  but you've watched the same episode like 1,000 times   you're  getting bored and hungry. So you go grab yourself a biscuit and you think maybe I should pretend I'm in a movie theatre.  And I could watch a cool movie and close all the curtains. And turn ‍‍all the lights off.
And grandpa might let me make some popcorn and drink a fizzy drink.  I'll first turn off the lights and then you instantly decide to pull the curtains close. So you grab the curtain and tug. But it just won't budge so you tug even harder. But it still won't move so you tug more, but the suddenly the railing falls on the carpet while it bounces making a vibrating sound . You look down at the curtains that were spread out among the floor. You realise you're in trouble.  So you get your pencils and paper and start to draw in your room. Somewhere other than the lounge. And you have that guilty feeling again.


Or maybe you were even at your own house and you accidently cracked your mum's special cat statue that was made of air dry  clay. Your mind repeats several times  “what do I do?” But you decide you will glue it back together, so grab the super glue and squirt a whole lot right in between where it had split. You push as hard as you can not knowing it would make it worse. But before a noticed it just broke right in half. Your mind is now screaming for help. You really can't handle the pain. Before your head just about explodes, you squirt  another lot of super glue on one half of the clay cat. And you push it carefully together this time it did stick together you're hoping it will set quickly so that no one will find out, but knowing the guilt is still glued inside.


We should all own up to our mistakes because then there will be less arguments, less crying and more honesty in the world. This will make it a better safer place for everyone. And it is better to tell someone the mistake you made because then you're not clinging onto guilt.
Next  time you make a mistake what are you going to do? Are you going to hide it? Keep it a secret? Or own up to what you did?   I didn't bring my iPad so I am going to do it tomorrow













Thursday, 8 September 2016

🐻Speech🐻 

Do you own up to your mistakes?
Maybe you accidentally broke your new clock. Or perhaps you accidentally pulled down the curtains or even ripped someone else's teddy?, You know what I mean. Maybe this has happened to you, but did you tell anyone?  Think back to a time you were dreading to tell someone what you did, but you too worried to let it out so you try to forget it and move on with your life. Then the teacher holds up a broken object and you shuffle into the background feeling all hot inside. We all make mistakes but we need to know how to fix them.

Picture this. You're at your friend's house making a hut with blankets and pillows, but wait, the chairs are in the lounge. Your friend repeats “I'll go get the chairs you wait here”. You start to fiddle around with one of  her  toys. It was a old black car with a pink frog inside. The frog was wearing a gold crown and it was very sparkly,with the gold glitter from the paint  shining in from the window. Your friend had told you it was her mum's and that she had it when she was little. You could tell by looking at it that it was well loved. You suddenly hear  your friend dragging the chair along the floor and without even realising it just slips right out of the palm of your hand, then you hear a bang. You look down, and there is the car tipped on its side. Your blood runs cold as a bit of plastic goes gliding along the shiny wood floor. You have no clue of what to do, yet there is a list of options right in front of you. But you choose to hesitantly hide it under a pile of toys that you happen to see next to you. Then you see your friend dragging 3 chairs into the room. Luckily she doesn't notice it is gone and you both carry on. But you're still hiding the guilt.

Or maybe you're at your grandparents house and you're watching telly  but you've watched the same episode like 1,000 times   you're  getting bored and hungry. So you go grab yourself a biscuit and you think maybe I should pretend I'm in a movie theatre.  And I could watch a cool movie and close all the curtains. And turn all the lights off.
And grandpa might let me make some popcorn and drink a fizzy drink.  I'll first turn off the lights and then you instantly decide to pull the curtains close. So you grab the curtain and tug. But it just won't budge so you tug even harder. But it still won't move so you tug more, but the suddenly the railing falls on the carpet while it bounces making a vibrating sound . You look down at the curtains that were spread out among the floor. You realise you're in trouble.  So you get your pencils and paper and start to draw in your room. Somewhere other than the lounge. And you have that guilty feeling again.

Or maybe you were even at your own house and you accidently cracked your mum's special cat statue that was made of air dry  clay. Your mind repeats several times  “what do I do?” But you decide you will glue it back together, so grab the super glue and squirt a whole lot right in between where it had split. You push as hard as you can not knowing it would make it worse. But before a noticed it just broke right in half. Your mind is now screaming for help. You really can't handle the pain. Before your head just about explodes, you squirt  another lot of super glue on one half of the clay cat. And you push it carefully together this time it did stick together you're hoping it will set quickly so that no one will find out, but knowing the guilt is still glued inside.


We should all own up to our mistakes because then there will be less arguments, less crying and more honesty in the world. This will make it a better safer place for everyone. And it is better to tell someone the mistake you made because then you're not clinging onto guilt. 
Next  time you make a mistake what are you going to do? Are you going to hide it? Keep it a secret? Or own up to what you did?

 








 


 






Thursday, 7 July 2016

Prejudice

Excitement turns down when you feel different. You're on your way to your new school you give your mum & dad a hug goodbye. As you're waving at the front window of the car, you notice people are pointing, then turn away to their friends and start to snigger. You’re thinking is it my hair? Is it my clothes? You hear a slight movement, and as you turn you see a girl shuffle to a girl's ear. You gulp. Hundreds of eyes follow your every step. You wish you could go home.

New Zealand has a hidden problem. Most immigrants don't feel welcome in NZ. 
One in ten people feel like they are being treated unfairly. Most  of them feel like they are being judged. The most common way to feel unwelcome is based on their skin, their race, ethnicity even their gender. People that experienced moving to Christchurch sometimes  felt judged. 
we could change that. 

There are many  ways to make immigrants feel welcome. Firstly you could ask for their name. This will make them feel welcome. Another thing you could do is ask if they would like to join you for lunch or morning tea. In addition to this you could next ask what they like to do. Furthermore you could perhaps organise a play at your house. This has an effect on the way people think about others. If everyone starts to do this, we will make the world a safer place.

There are ways to make immigrants feel welcome, and there are ways to do the opposite. Hate is not a word to be put on people. Hate is a word that destroys friendships. It breaks people apart, like that time you went to school and children glare and chuckle you felt like there were four walls built around you. Hate brings tears to your eyes. No one evens asks your name. Children glare at your sad face. Is this really how the world is supposed to be?

This term our class has been learning about prejudice and to find people that have immigrated from a different country to Christchurch. The whole class had to get in touch with someone that moved here. We got a lot of information about how they felt when they moved to chch they gave us some advice for new people that immigrate here. They said we need to try harder to include them more often so they feel more like they belong. To do this you could always let them join in your conversation, smile say hello. This is a good picture of being kind and included. There is a lot more you could do. For example you could also offer if they would like to come to lunch with you. This means that you will make others happy and it leaves you as a generous person. This will make the world a better life  for everyone  because the more we do this it will make the world a better place.

Tuesday, 24 May 2016

climbing up the needle

The sun is a light bulb that I am ready to turn off.  It is 34 degrees and I am about to climb the tallest hill in Rarotonga. The feeling inside of me tearing away at all of my good thoughts.
I hear the leaves brushing against other leaves, I see the small flax bush with its small arms ready to slice and cut people with its razor sharp blades. The path is like a piece of paper that has been drawn on with a green crayon but all scrunched up. The roots are slippery like a water slide, one wrong step and I’ll be rolling down the hill like a tennis ball. 

This is not going to end well! I can no longer see Sophia, Theo or Iñaki, they are like sparks shooting up the hill. I keep taking steps on the soft green moss leading up wards. I am only a quarter way up the hill and I'm already regretting putting my hand up for this. 
I keep walking… 
“Ahhhhhhhhhhh!” I hear a scream. I stand still and hope for glory, but the screaming is still happening 
“Ahhhhh, ahhhhhh, ahhhhhhhh!!” Lidia is racing down the hill screaming. Mum asks Lidia to be quiet. 
“What is going on?” I say. I can see mum, she is also standing at the bottom of the hill. A loud buzz sound is coming closer and closer, still Lidia  is is the only one screaming down the hill. I walk down the hill a bit  to see Lydia and ask her “Why were you screaming?” 
“Did you not see the bees swarming us? You were the one standing perfectly” mum said. 

We kept walking down the hill, speechless. We shiver with fear, goose bumps are surrounding our body. When we get to the bottom of the hill we watch out for Sophia, Iñaki and Theo to pop out of the bush where the walk first starts.








In this piece of  writing I was learning to appeal to senses and to build up an emotion. My emotion was supposed to be fear. I was trying to build up the the emotion by using good words from my book called bright sparks book. To appeal to senses I had to use what I see hear felt and smelt and things like that. For example, ‘I see a small flax bush with its small arms ready to slice and cut people with its razor sharp blades’. As well as showing the senses, it also has a emotion to it. My next step is to add full stops in while I am writing. 


Monday, 2 May 2016

Arts reflection

This term I have been learning about the elements of music and how to show a special place using a piece of music which is called a soundscape. I made my soundscape using  body features and instruments and anything else that sounds like something from a special place. For example if you blow In a quiet way it may sound like wind. In my soundscape I rubbed my hands together to make the sound of harakeke. I used my fireplace to make the sound of water. I used a box of beads to make the sound of the waves. And I blew to make sound of birds gliding.  I think my soundscape is multistructural because I used things to make sounds to connect with my poem.




WHERE DOES MY HEART LIE?


Where the boat dances on top of the shimmering water,
Surrounded by harakeke using its long arms to greet me. 

Where, the King fishers glide along the water's edge
Looking with eagle eyes for a slimy fish to feed on.

Where the angry waves belly flop onto the sand.
And the sand monster sucks my feet in like quicksand.

Where the wood pigeon swoops up the valley like a plane.
And the bell bird chirps a lovely song, practising for choir.

Where stray cats wander through the long wavy grass hunting their prey.
And the rocks sit there like houses waiting to break down.

I love this place 
to watch the water, to hear the birds, to have picnics…
It is my happy place.

Thursday, 14 April 2016

Artwork poem

I feel weird, goose bumps surround my body.
The smell of hay is a tsunami surrounding the barn. 
The rhino is a rock, eating hay stiffly.
I look around, nobody notices me staring.

I stare at one girl,
the girl with a black mask.
I inspect the mask.

Deafening silence tortures me.
My eyes riveted to the one girl 
with the black mask.
The slight breeze brushes against my ear.

I wonder what is outside of this barn?
What is a rhino doing there?
Where am I?


_______

During literacy I have been learning to make a poem from a piece of art. It is a bit hard for me because I have never done it before but I still like some of my ideas, for example "the smell of hay is a tsunami surrounding the barn." I really enjoy doing this because I think it is fun describing what I would feel like in a painting. At the same time it does actually feel like I'm in a painting.
I always have wonderings in my head when I look at paintings but I never work them out.
I think my poem is relational  because I have a lot of similes and metaphors and that is what we needed to have in our poem.